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Thinking About Foot Surgery? Ten Things You Need To Think About BEFORE You Have Foot Surgery.

Ten Things You Need To Think About BEFORE  You Have Foot Surgery. 1. You need to exhaust conservative treatment before you decide...

Sunday, June 10, 2018

Podiatrist Recommend Hiking Boot - Salomon Quest 4D 3 GTX

Podiatrist Recommended 

Men's Hiking Boots



 Quest 4D 3 GTX


This is an excellent men's hiking shoe and, if you are a woman who can't find a comfortable hiking shoe, go to REI and try on this men's boot. This is the boot that my husband (aka Mister 15,000 steps per day!) is currently wearing and it has resolved some foot issues that he was developing while wearing his old hiking boots, which were wearing out and getting too flexible (and therefore causing foot pain).

For a shoe to be good enough for your feet (and be comfortable), they must meet 4 criteria:

1. They must have a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole that allows no motion through painful joints. It's counterintuitive, but a rigid and non-flexible sole is the most important feature of a shoe. 90% of all shoes out there are complete garbage because their soles are too flexible and flimsy. Soles that allow motion through painful joints cause more pain and joint damage.  

2. A wide toe box, so there is no pressure on the toes and toenails, which can cause bunions, hammertoes, corns, Morton's Neuromas, Tailor's bunions, and fungal toenails.  

3. Rearfoot control, which means that you have to at least have a strap around the back of the shoe (no flip-flops or mules). Rearfoot control allows for more biomechanical control of the foot and ankle structures, which means less inflammation, swelling and pain.  

4. Arch support, which you can do with a custom-molded orthotic or at least an excellent over-the-counter insert for better arch support. 


If your foot hurts, you might want to consider going to the store and trying on this boot because it's sort of like wearing a mini-CAM-walker, which is what is used to treat broken bones in the feet. 

This boot is recommended for patients with:
*Plantar Fasciitis (heel pain)
*Hallux Rigidus (no motion through the 1st toe joint)
*Hallux Limitus (limited motion through 1st toe joint) 
*Functional Hallux Limitus 
*history of Lisfranc's Joint Injuries
*Morton's Neuroma (make sure that the toe box is wide and causes no pressure on the forefoot area)
*Metatarsalgia
*Capsulitis
*Mild to Moderate Bunions
*Hammertoes
*Tailor's Bunions
*Plantar Plate Injuries
*Osteoarthritis
*Degenerative Joint Disease
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis 
*Posterior Tibial Tendonitis
*Peroneal Tendonitis
*Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome (wear orthotics) 
*Sinus Tarsi Syndrome 

This boot is not recommended for patients with:
*History of Diabetic Ulcerations
*Charcot Foot
*Charcot Marie Tooth Disease
*Muscle Weakness
*Foot Drop 

Check with your podiatrist if you have these conditions: 
*Diabetes
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage) 

For more information, please check out these articles:

Shoe recommendation for patients recovering from Lisfranc's Injuries.

My feet hurt! Top 10 things to do to alleviate foot pain today.

I hope this was helpful!

Dr. Cathleen A. McCarthy 

:) 

 

Saturday, May 5, 2018

Clarks Wedge Heels - Podiatrist Recommended for some foot types.

Clarks Maritsa Lara
Podiatrist Recommended




The Clark's Maritsa Lara is a great choice for fashion and comfort for some foot types. What makes this shoe comfortable is that it meets 3 of the 4 criteria required for a shoe to be good enough for your feet. 

Most importantly, this shoe has a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole which is absolutely crucial for foot comfort. Shoes with flexible soles are horrible for your feet because a shoe that allows motion through joints causes pain, inflammation, swelling and can lead to osteoarthritic joint changes. Secondly, this shoe has a wide toe box that helps prevent the risk of hammertoes, bunions, corns, neuromas, ingrown toenails, and fungal toenails. The rearfoot strap helps to control motion which means that there will be less biomechanical strain on joints and tendons, which will help to speed the healing of pathologies such as Achilles tendonitis and plantar fasciitis. Wearing a shoe with rearfoot strapping also helps to decrease strain on the knees, hips and lower back. 

This shoe is recommended for patients with:
*Plantar Fasciitis (heel pain)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis 
*Mild Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion through the 1st toe joint) 
*Mild Functional Hallux Limitus
*Mild Hypermobility
*Mild Over-Pronation
*Mild Morton's Neuroma
*Mild Metatarsalgia
*Mild Bunions
*Mild to Moderate Hammertoes
*Mild Capsulitis
*Mild Tailor's Bunions
*Mild Osteoarthritis (maybe) 
*History of previous Lisfranc's Injury (maybe) 

This shoe is not recommended for patients with: 
*Hallux Rigidus (no motion through 1st toe joint)
*Balance Issues
*Peripheral Neuropathy (nerve damage)
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (poor circulation)
*Diabetes
*History of Ulcerations
*Lymphedema (excessive swelling) 
*Drop Foot
*Ankle Instability 
*Severe Hypermobility
*Severe Over-Pronation
*Severe Osteoarthritis 
*Rheumatoid Arthritis 
*Charcot-Marie Tooth
*Charcot Foot 

For more information about comfortable shoes and your feet, please refer to these articles: 

My feet hurt! Top 10 things to alleviate foot pain today. 

Shoe recommendations for patients recovering from Lisfranc's Injuries. 


I hope this was helpful!

Dr. Cathleen A. McCarthy

:)



Sunday, April 22, 2018

Naot Sandals for Summer 2018 - Podiatrist Approved!


Naot Sandals
Podiatrist Approved for Summer 2018



Naot Alpicola



Naot Verbina




Naot Begonia

Naot Ficus

Naot Krista

Naot Sophia


These Naot sandals are all good choices for the Summer of 2018! They each meet three of the four criteria that makes an excellent sandal, which is that they all have a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole, a wide toebox, and rearfoot control. Although they do not have the best arch support, it is possible to add self-adhesive over-the-counter arch support if needed.

For a shoe to be good enough for your feet, it must have a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole that stops motion through painful joints, tendons, ligaments, and muscles. The idea is counterintuitive, but the essence is that if you stop motion through painful joints (with a rigid sole) then you stop or limit the pain through those joints. If you have arthritic joints or a tendency to develop stress fractures or a history of a previous foot fracture then the last thing you want to do is wear shoes that are flimsy and allow motion through compromised and painful foot structures. 

A wide toe box helps prevent hammertoes, bunions, corns, and ingrown toenails. The rearfoot control is important because if you are wearing shoes that are backless, then you are promoting hammertoes, tendonitis, and knee, hip, and lower back strain. 

These sandals are recommended for patients with:
*Bunions
*Hammertoes
*Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion through 1st toe joint)
*Functional Hallux Limitus
*Hallux Rigidus (no range of motion through 1st toe joint)
*Osteoarthritis
*Rheumatoid Arthritis
*Metatarsalgia
*Morton's Neuroma
*Capsulitis
*Tailor's Bunions
*Plantar Fasciitis
*Achilles Tendonitis
*History of Lisfranc's Injuries
*Hypermobility / Ligament Laxity
*Pes Planus
*Plantar Plate Injury 

These sandals are not recommended for patients with: 
*Diabetes
*History of Ulcerations
*Charcot Foot

Check with your Podiatrist to see if these sandals are appropriate for you if you have: 
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (poor circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (nerve damage)
*Ankle Instability 

For more information, please refer to my other articles: 

Podiatrist top 10 recommendation to alleviate foot pain

Shoe recommendations for patients recovering from Lisfranc injuries


I hope this was helpful!

Dr. Cathleen A. McCarthy

:)






Saturday, March 10, 2018

Dr. Marten's Rometty Boot for women - Podiatrist Recommended

Dr. Marten's Rometty Boot for Women

Podiatrist Recommended




The Dr. Marten's Rometty boot is a great choice for many people who are having foot pain, but they are not an appropriate choice for every foot type and condition. What makes this boot excellent is that it has a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole that protects the foot joints from excessive motion, which means there will be less strain and stress on painful joints. Less motion means less inflammation, less swelling, less damage and significantly less foot pain. A rigid sole will also help slow the progression of bunions, hammertoes and osteoarthritic joint changes. 

The concept is counterintuitive, but the flexible and flimsy soled shoes are actually the shoes that are responsible for many foot injuries and they significantly increase strain on the knees, hips and lower back. In fact, the best way to get a stress fracture is to walk barefoot or wear "minimalist" shoes.  

You can add a thin heat-molded insert or a dress orthotic to the Dr. Marten's boot for better arch support. I also like that the boot has plenty of room to add a heel lift to help correct for any limb length discrepancy. It also has a wide toe box and fantastic rearfoot control. 

I highly recommend you try on these shoes at the store if at all possible so that you can ensure a proper fit. 


Recommended for patients with:
*Hallux Rigidus (no motion through the 1st toe joint)
*Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion through the 1st toe joint)
*Functional Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion through the 1st toe joint with full weight bearing)
*Osteoarthritis
*Mild possibly Moderate Bunions
*Mild to Moderate Hammertoes
*Mild Tailor's Bunion
*Mild to possibly Moderate Achilles Tendonitis
*Peroneal Tendonitis
*Posterior Tibial Tendonitis
*History of Lisfranc's Injury
*Plantar Fasciitis (heel pain) 
*Metatarsalgia
*Morton's Neuroma
*Capsulitis
*Plantar Plate Injuries
*History of Stress Fractures
*Ingrown Toenails
*Corns & Calluses
*Hypermobility
*Ligament Laxity
*Over-Pronation
*Ankle Instability
*Mild to Moderate Haglund's Deformity 

Not recommended for patients with: 
*Diabetics with a history of foot ulcerations
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (poor circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (nerve damage) 
*Charcot Foot 
*Muscle Weakness
*Drop Foot 
*The Elderly
*Severe Haglund's Deformity
*Exostosis or "bump" on the top of the midfoot  
*Severe Bunions (as toe box may be too small) 

Check with your Podiatrist if you have these conditions:
*Rheumatoid Arthritis 
*Diabetes 

For more information, check out these articles:

Podiatrist top 10 recommendations to alleviate foot pain

Shoe recommendations for patients recovering from Lisfranc injuries



I hope that this was helpful!

Cathleen A. McCarthy

:)



Monday, February 26, 2018

Nike Air Monarch - Podiatrist's Recommendation.

Nike Air Monarch 

Podiatrist's Recommendation for Men's Exercise Shoe

The Nike Air Monarch is an excellent choice for a men's exercise shoe because it meets the four criteria for what a shoe must have to be comfortable and keep your more active with less chance of injury to your feet and ankles. The Nike Air Monarch is not appropriate for hiking on trails as you will need a trail hiking shoe, but the Nike Air Monarch is a perfect go-to shoe for general activities, walking and the gym. 

The 4 criteria needed for a shoe to be excellent are:

1. Thick, rigid and non-flexible sole. Any shoe with a flexible sole will allow too much motion through joints that may be compromised by underlying biomechanical foot issues, previous injuries and arthritic joint damage. It is counterintuitive but all shoes need to have rigid and non-flexible soles so as to protect the joints of the foot, which will then translate into less pain and joint damage. A rigid sole will also prevent the formation of bunions, hammertoes, tendon strain and osteoarthritis. 

2. Wide toe box. A wider toe box means less pressure on the toes, which will slow the progression of bunions, hammertoes, corns, ingrown toenails and even toenail fungus. In my opinion, it is impossible to get rid of toenail fungus if you are wearing tight-fitting shoes because it is injury (even microtrauma) to the toenails that is what allows the fungal spores to set up house in the nail bed. 

3. Rearfoot Control. Shoes that do not have rearfoot control force you to grip down your toes to stay in the shoe, which then promotes hammertoes, tendon strain as well as more strain on the knees, hips and lower back. If you have rearfoot issues such as Achilles tendonitis, Posterior Tibial or Peroneal tendonitis, it is very important that your shoes have rearfoot control because less motion gives the tendons a chance to heal. 

4. It can accommodate a custom-molded orthotic or a good over the counter insert for more arch support. Arch support will decrease strain on the ankles, knees, hips and lower back. It will also help decrease arthritic changes to the Lisfranc's joint and help support the joint for anyone who has had a previous injury to the Lisfranc's joint. 

This shoe is recommended for patients with:
*Plantar Fasciitis (heel pain)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Posterior Tibial Tendonitis
*Peroneal Tendonitis
*History of previous Lisfranc's Injury
*Hallux Rigidus 
*Hallux Limitus
*Functional Hallux Limitus
*Osteoarthritis
*Morton's Neuroma
*Metatarsalgia
*Capsulitis
*Plantar Plate Injuries
*Hammertoes
*Mild to Moderate Bunions 
*Tailor's Bunions
*Corns & Calluses 
*Ingrown Toenails
*Over-Pronation
*Hypermobility & Ligament Laxity
*Ankle Instability 

This shoe is not recommended for patients with: 
*Charcot Foot
*Lymphedema
*Excessive Swelling

Check with your podiatrist if you have: 
*Rheumatoid Arthritis
*Diabetes
*History of Ulcerations 
*Drop Foot (this shoe should be able to accommodate a drop-foot plate or AFO, which is a custom-molded brace) 
*Peripheral Neuropathy (nerve damage) 
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (poor circulation) 

For more information, check these articles:

Top 10 things to alleviate foot pain today. 

Shoe recommendations for patients recovering from Lisfranc's Injuries. 



I hope this was helpful! 

Dr. Cathleen A. McCarthy 

:)

Saturday, February 10, 2018

Crocs Neria Pro Graphic Clog - Podiatrist Recommended Shoes

Podiatrist Recommended Shoe



Croc's Neria Pro Graphic Clog 


The Neria Pro Graphic Clog is a slip-resistant shoe that is a great choice for anyone who has to work long hours on concrete floors such as retail, medical or restaurant environments. However, this shoe is not the ideal choice for anyone works on uneven, rocky terrains. 

What makes this clog excellent is that it meets the four criteria needed to make a shoe comfortable:

1. It has a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole. For a shoe to be comfortable it must have a thick, rigid sole with no flexibility. If you are wearing a shoe with a flexible sole then you are allowing excessive motion through joints that may be arthritic, dysfunctional or painful. Motion through these joints will increase pain, injury and promote arthritic joint changes, which then leads to compensating gait patterns which then further aggravates your knees, hips and lower back strain. Flexible-soled shoes speed up the progression of bunions, hammertoes and degenerative joint changes.  

2. Wide toe box. A tight-fitting toe box promotes hammertoes, bunions, corns, ingrown toenails and even toenail fungus. If you are trying to get rid of toenail fungus I can promise you that if you are in tight-fitting shoes with flexible soles that you will never get rid of it. For you to effectively treat fungal nails, it is crucial that you wear shoes with rigid soles, wide toe box and rearfoot control because it is the injury (even micro-trauma) to toenails that allows the fungus to get into the nail and nail bed which is what promotes the infection. Always try to find shoes with a wide and soft toe box that protects the toenails from injury.  

3. Rearfoot Control. If you are wearing shoes without rearfoot control (such as flip-flops or mules) then you are forced to grip down your toes which promotes hammertoes and bunions. It also allows more motion through the rearfoot area which can set you up for Achilles tendon injuries, plantar fasciitis (heel pain) as well as knee, hip and lower back strain. 

4. Arch support. It's ideal if you can find a shoe with a removable insole so that you can replace it with your custom-molded orthotics or an excellent over-the-counter insert such as a full-length Powerstep. Even if you think that you have a high arch and don't need arch support, I always tell patients that bridges have arches and engineers still put struts under the bridges to decrease mechanical strain. Arch support helps prevent midfoot (Lisfranc's Joint) arthritic changes, plantar fasciitis (heel pain) as well as decrease knee, hip and lower back pain.  

This shoe is recommended for patients with:
*Plantar  Fasciitis (heel pain)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Mild Peroneal Tendonitis
*Mild Posterior Tibial Tendonitis
*Over-Pronation
*Hypermobility / Ligament Laxity
*Hallux Limitus
*Functional Hallux Limitus
*Hallux Rigidus
*Osteoarthritis
*Rheumatoid Arthritis
*Morton's Neuroma
*Capsulitis
*Metatarsalgia
*Plantar Plate Injuries
*Knee, Hip & Lower Back Issues 
*Mild Bunions
*Mild Hammertoes
*Corns & Calluses
*Mild Tailor's Bunions 
*Mild Ankle Instability

This shoe is not recommended for patients with: 
*Charcot Foot
*History of Foot Ulcerations
*Geriatrics
*Foot Drop
*Charcot Marie Tooth Disease 
*Bone Spurs (Exostosis) on the top of the midfoot (Lisfranc's Joint). 
*C-Shaped feet 
*Skew-foot
*Anyone with large "bumps" on their feet 


Check with your podiatrist before wearing this shoe if you have:
*Diabetes
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (poor circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (nerve damage) 

* * *

For more information, please refer to my articles: 

Shoe recommendations for patients recovering from Lisfranc's joint injuries. 


Top 10 things to do to alleviate foot pain. 


* * *


Thank you for reading the blog and have a wonderful day!

Dr. Cathleen A. McCarthy 

:)









Sunday, December 10, 2017

Podiatrist's Review of Hoka Bondi 5 & Tor Summit.


Hoka One One 
Two Excellent Podiatrist Recommended Shoes




Hoka One One Bondi 5 Running Shoe




Hoka One One Tor Summit Waterproof Hiking Shoe

These two Hoka One One shoes are an excellent choice for most patients with finicky feet. What makes these two shoes so good are that they both meet the 4 criteria that a shoe needs to be comfortable:

1. A thick, rigid sole with no motion or flexibility. Less motion through painful or sore joints means less inflammation, less swelling and less damage to the joints. All of this translates into less pain! 

2. A wide toebox, which puts less pressure on toes which stops or slows the progression of bunions, hammertoes, ingrown toenails, corns. 

3. Rearfoot control. If you are walking in shoes without rearfoot control you are scrunching down your toes to stay in the shoe and that promotes hammertoes, bunions, tired leg syndrome as well as knee, hip and lower back discomfort. 

4. Arch support. Both of these shoes can accommodate custom-molded orthotics or a good over-the-counter arch supports, which helps prevent knee, hip and lower back discomfort as well as to and slow the progression of bunions, hammertoes, and tendonitis.  

These shoes are recommended for patients with:
*Plantar Fasciitis (heel pain)
*Mild to moderate bunions
*Hammertoes
*Morton's Neuromas
*Metatarsalgia
*Capsulitis
*Sesamoiditis
*Hallux Limitus
*Functional Hallux Limitus
*Hallux Rigidus
*Osteoarthritis
*Peroneal Tendonitis (wear with orthotics or arch support) 
*PT Tendonitis (wear with orthotics or arch support) 
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*History of Lisfranc's Injuries (wear with orthotics or arch support) 
*Plantar Plate Issues   


These shoes are not recommended for patients with:
*Diabetes with history of Ulcerations
*Charcot Foot
*Drop Foot 
*Severe Achilles Tendonitis (you need a shoe with less cushion and more stability - like a New Balance 928 or 1540)
*Not for Geriatric patients with muscle weakness, instability or severe balance issues (they need a lighter shoe with more stability such as New Balance 813 with velcro strapping).


Check with your podiatrist to see if these shoes are appropriate for you if you have: 
*Rheumatoid Arthritis
*Diabetes


For more information, please refer to these other articles:

Shoe recommendations for patients recovering from Lisfranc's injuries



I hope this was helpful! 

Dr. Cathleen McCarthy

:)