Wednesday, January 1, 2014

Top 25 Comfortable Women's Dress Boots for 2014 - Podiatrist Recommended.

Podiatrist Recommended
Top 25 Comfortable Women's Boots
2014

A Blog dedicated to:

How to find good looking shoes
that are good for your feet
that are pathology specific.



I started with a 'Top 10' list and it quickly snowballed into a 'Top 25' list! Remember, no matter what type of boot you choose for yourself, it must meet four criteria to be comfortable: 

First, it must have a thick rigid sole that you cannot bend or flex. A thin, flimsy sole that bends and flexes will cause excess motion through your foot joints, which can lead to increased chance of injury such as fractures and sprains, arthritis, bunions, hammertoes, mechanical strain and PAIN. A good shoe is a shoe that limits motion so that you have less pain, less damage, less chance of injury and, an added bonus, prettier feet. As you walk through life, you are either beating up your feet or you are beating up your shoes - if you think what your shoes look like after a couple of years of use - without the protection of a thick rigid sole - that damage is going to be happening to your joints. 

Second, you need arch support. Whether it is built into the shoe, over-the-counter arch support or a custom-molded orthotic - it is important to biomecahnically control your arch. When patients say to me that they have great arches and don't need arch support, my answer is that bridges have arches but engineers still put struts under them to decrease mechanical strain. Proper arch support will help decrease knee, hip and lower back pain as well as stop or slow the progression of bunions, hammertoes and soft tissue injuries such as tendonitis and plantar fascial strain. Talk to your Podiatrist about whether or not your insurance plan pays for you to get custom-molded orthotics. They are often a covered benefit. You only have one set of feet and once they break down - you don't get a new pair. Invest in your body and purchase good shoes and get orthotics. It's the same rationale as a dentist telling you to brush and floss on a regular basis and a dermatologist telling you to wear sunscreen. You need to protect your body because it is just a matter of time until it tries to go south on you. 

Third, you need a wide and preferably soft toebox. This will decrease pressure on the toes, which will help prevent ingrown toenails, hammertoes, bunions, Morton's Neuromas and painful corns and calluses. 

Forth, you need a shoe with rearfoot control. Backless shoes such as flipflops and mules are not good enough for your feet. If you are not biomechanically controlling the rearfoot with at least a strap, you are forcing your toes to curl down to stay in the shoe, which promotes deformities such as hammertoes and bunions and increases the chance of knee, hip and lower back pain. Without rearfoot control, you are forcing all of your tendons, ligaments and joints to work harder to stay in the shoe. This also causes 'tired-leg syndrome' and leg fatigue. 

If you have any severe foot issues or systemic diseases, please check with your Podiatrist to make sure that a particular boot is correct for you. I encourage patients to bring in one bag of shoes so that we can check each shoe together and have a discussion about what will or will not work for their feet. Proper shoegear is absolutely crucial! 

My goal as a Podiatrist is to keep my patients as active as possible for as long as possible with as few problems as possible. And this goal can be achieved with the help of proper shoegear. 

Okay - enough preaching! Let's get to the list...




Ugg Kensington II


I love the Uggs! Not all Uggs are good but if you get one with a thick rigid sole, wide toebox and rearfoot control and add a dress orthotic - you are pretty much gold.  

Ugg Kensington II is Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild to possibly severe Bunions
*Mild to possibly severe Hammertoes
*Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Any patient with a fused toe joint
*Morton's Neuroma
*Metatarsalgia
*Capsulitis
*Anyone recovering from a Lisfranc's Fracture
*Plantar Plate Injury
*Osteoarthritis
*Mild to possibly severe Rheumatoid Arthritis
*Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Mild to severe Over-Pronation (wear dress orthotics)
*Mild to moderate Hypermobility (wear with dress orthotics)

Ugg Kensington II is NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Charcot Foot
*Achilles Tendonitis (these patients need a slightly higher heel lift in the back - such as a low wedge to decrease tension on the Achilles)
*Diabetic (Clear this boot with your Podiatrist)
*History of Ulcerations
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Clear with your Podiatrist)
*Peripheral Neuropathy/Nerve Damage (Clear with your Podiatrist)





Tsubo Kynlee

The Tsubo Kynlee is a gorgeous boot. If you know that you can handle wearing a slight heel, this boot should work for you. If you have severe Hallux Limitus, Hallux Rigidus or significant forefoot isses, the wedge may not be ideal for you. Basically, if you can wear this heel height with no problems, this should be a good choice. 

Tsubo Kynlee Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild Bunions
*Mild Hammertoes
*Mild Hallux Limitus
*Mild Morton's Neuroma
*Mild Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Mild Over-Pronation (wear a dress orthotic)
*Mild Hypermobility (wear a dress orthotic)
*Patients recovering from Lisfranc's injuries or fractures

Tsubo Kynlee NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint) 
*Moderate to Severe Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Severe Osteoarthritis of any of the forefoot joints.
*Moderate to Severe Bunions 
*Moderate to Severe Hammertoes
*Diabetics
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*Charcot Foot
*History of Ulcerations
*Balance Issues





Dr. Marten's Pendleton


It's hard to go wrong with Dr. Marten's shoes. I've noticed that some of the Dr. Marten's soles do bend and flex a little but most of the Dr. Marten's have the thick, rigid sole that does not bend or flex. When shopping in the store, double check and make sure that the sole does not bend or flex. 

Dr. Marten's Pendleton Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild Bunions
*Mild Hammertoes
*Mild to possibly Moderate Morton's Neuroma
*Mild to possibly Moderate Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Mild Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Mild to Moderate Ankle Instability (wear a dress orthotic)
*History of ankle sprains 
*Mild to moderate tendonitis (wear dress orthotic)
*Mild to Moderate Over-Pronation (wear dress orthotic)
*Mild to moderate Hypermobility (wear dress orthotic)
*Plantar Fibromas

Dr. Marten's Pendleton is NOT Recommend for Patients with:
*Charcot Foot
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Severe Osteoarthritis of any of the forefoot joints
*Moderate to Severe Haglund's Deformity (bump on the back of the heel)
*Severe Bunions
*Severe Hammertoes
*Diabetics
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*History of Ulcerations
*Anyone with significant 'bumps' or exostosis on the foot
*High arch with 'bumps' or bone spurs on top of the foot




Naot Gratify 


The Naot Gratify is a gorgeous boot and has a full lenfth shaft which allows for less motion through the forefoot and therefore more comfort. Not all Naot shoes have a full length shaft, which is a disappointment so if you are shopping for a Naot - make sure you get one with the full length shaft and not a partial shaft. There's a huge difference in comfort. 

Naot Gratify Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild to moderate Bunions
*Mild to moderate Hammertoes
*Mild to moderate Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Morton's Neuroma
*Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Achilles Tendonitis
*Over-Pronation (wear a dress orthotic)
*Hypermobility (wear a dress orthotic)
*Patients recovering from Lisfranc's injuries or fractures

Naot Gratify NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint) 
*Severe Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Diabetics (Get approval from your Podiatrist before wearing this boot) 
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Get approval from you Podiatrist before wearing this boot)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Get approval from your Podiatrist before wearing this boot)
*Charcot Foot
*History of Ulcerations





Tsubo Dess 


Gorgeous boot! I love the Tsubo shoes and I love to dress up jeans with this look. This heel height is not for everyone but if you know that you can wear this heel height comfortably, this boot should work for you. 

Tsubo Dess Boots Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Mild Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain) 

Tsubo Dess Boots NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Charcot Foot
*Diabetics
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*History of Ulcerations
*Balance Issues
*Severe Hypermobility or Instability
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Osteoarthritis of any of the toe joints
*High arches with 'bump' or exostosis on the top of the foot
*Haglund's Deformity
*Recovering from a Lisfranc's Fracture
*Metatarsalgia
*Capsulitis
*Plantar Plate Injury




Dansko Crepe Chukka


If you are doing a lot of walking on concrete and hard surfaces - this might be your boot. The Dansko Crepe Chukka has a thick rigid sole with NO motion, which translates into all day comfort. Add a dress orthotic for more arch control and it's hard to go wrong with this boot. The only limitations with Dansko is that if you have prominent 'bumps' such as bunions or exostosis and bone spurs - there might be too much pressure on them which can cause pain. An option is to take the shoe to a Cobbler or Shoe Repair and have them stretch the area over the bunion or 'bump'.  

This Boot Recommended for Patients with:
*Hallux Limitus
*Hallux Rigidus
*Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Morton's Neuroma
*Metatarsalgia
*Plantar Plate Issues
*Capsulitis
*Bunions
*Hammertoes
*Corns & Calluses
*Tailor's Bunions
*History of Lisfrand's Injury
*Recovered from Foot Fractures (Clear with your Pod)
*Osteoarthritis
*Knee, Hip and Lower Back Pain
*Over-Pronation (wear with a dress orthotic)
*Mild Hypermobility (wear with a dress orthotic)

This Boot NOT Recommended for Patients with: 
*Charcot Foot
*Diabetics (Clear with your Podiatrist)
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Clear with your Podiatrist)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*Muscle Weakness
*Drop Foot
*Severe Hypermobility
*Instability
*Geriatrics




Dansko Tabitha 


Dansko is fabulous but they are not for everybody. I would recommend that if you are shopping for Dansko, go to the store to try them on. If you have large bunions or 'bumps' on the top of the midfoot area, Danskos might not work for you.

Dansko Tabitha Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild Bunions
*Mild Hammertoes
*Mild to moderate Hallux Limitus
*Mild Morton's Neuroma
*Mild Metatarsalgia
*Mild Plantar Plate Injuries
*Mild Capsulitis
*Plantar Fasciits (Heel Pain)
*Achilles Tendonitis
*Mild to moderate Osteoarthritis

Dansko Tabitha NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Severe Tailor's Bunions
Severe Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Diabetics
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage) 
*History of Ulcerations
*Charcot Foot



Ugg Anais


I had to add this boot because I love the style! The heel height is a bit high but if you know that you can handle this heel height, this should be a comfortable boot for you. The wedge heel gives added protection to the forefoot structures and more of a 'roll off' action when you walk - this will cause less stress to the forefoot. 

Ugg Anais Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Women who know that they can wear this heel height comfortably

Ugg Anais NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint) 
*Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Osteoarthritis of any of the forefoot joints.
*Bunions 
*Hammertoes
*Diabetics
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*Charcot Foot
*History of Ulcerations
*Balance Issues




Dansko Faith


I love the Danskos but I recommend purchasing this one in the store. I've noticed that since Dansko has started manufacturing more shoes in China - the forefoot area can have too much bend and the toebox has gotten a little smaller and more narrow. Make sure the forefoot wedge does not bend and, if you can know that you can wear this heel height comfortably, this should be a good boot for you. 

Dansko Faith Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Women who know that they can wear this heel height comfortably

Dansko Faith NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint) 
*Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Osteoarthritis of any of the forefoot joints.
*Bunions 
*Hammertoes
*Diabetics
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*Charcot Foot
*History of Ulcerations
*Balance Issues




John Fluevog On Course Leeward


This is my Christmas gift - that has still not arrived! I can't give a full review on this boot because I don't have it yet but it is so gorgeous and seems to meet all the criteria so I thought I'd add it to the list. I will give a further update once I get these bad boys on my feet! 




John Fluevog Prepares Map


As you know, I love John Fluevog shoes and this boot is no exception. The wedge heel is solid and very comfortable. I can walk in this shoe all day. I love the wide toebox with soft leather that feels like butter. If you purchase this boot, buy extra boot laces because, for some reason, the laces on this boot break easily. 

This Boot Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild Bunions
*Mild Hammertoes
*Mild Hallux Limitus
*Mild Morton's Neuroma
*Mild to possibly Moderate Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Mild Over-Pronation (wear a dress orthotic)
*Mild Hypermobility (wear a dress orthotic)

This Boot NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint) 
*Severe Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Severe Osteoarthritis of any of the forefoot joints.
*Severe Bunions 
*Severe Hammertoes
*Diabetics
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*Charcot Foot
*History of Ulcerations
*Balance Issues


Dansko Vail


Another fabulous Dansko boot. It's very hard to go wrong with this boot - especially if you need to do lots of outdoor walking in bad weather.

Dansko Vail is Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild to Moderate Bunions
*Mild to Moderate Hammertoes
*Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Any patient with a fused toe joint
*Morton's Neuroma
*Metatarsalgia
*Capsulitis
*Patients recovering from a Lisfranc's Fracture
*Plantar Plate Injury
*Osteoarthritis
*Mild to Moderate Rheumatoid Arthritis (Check with your Podiatrist)
*Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Over-Pronation (wear dress orthotics)
*Mild to Moderate Hypermobility (wear with dress orthotics)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Mild Tendonitis


Dansko Vail is NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Charcot Foot
*Diabetics (Clear with your Podiatrist)
*History of Ulcerations
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Clear with your Podiatrist)
*Peripheral Neuropathy/Nerve Damage (Clear with your Podiatrist)






Frye Harness 12R


I own this boot and wore it several years ago on a 10 day walking winter tour of Berlin and Vienna. With socks and my dress orthotic, they kept me warm and dry and walking in comfort all day long. The only issue I have with this boot is that the forefoot area tends to be a bit too tapered so if you have a wide forefoot, this may not work for you. The boot has a rigid sole and great rearfoot control and it looks great under jeans. If you have a 5th toe hammertoe with a corn - either try to size up or get a boot with a wider toebox like the Alegria. 


This Boot Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild bunions
*Mild Hammertoes
*Hallux Rigidus (Maybe - assuming there are no significant bone spurs)
*Mild Morton's Neuroma
*Mild to possibly Moderate Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Mild Osteoarthritis 
*Mild Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Mild to Moderate Ankle Instability (wear a dress orthotic)
*History of ankle sprains 
*Mild to moderate tendonitis (wear dress orthotic)
*Mild to Moderate Over-Pronation (wear dress orthotic)
*Mild to moderate Hypermobility (wear dress orthotic)

This Boot is NOT Recommend for Patients with:
*Charcot Foot
*Moderate to Severe Haglund's Deformity (bump on the back of the heel)
*Prominent Bunions
*Moderate to Severe Hammertoes
*5th toe corns
*Diabetics
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*History of Ulcerations
*Anyone with significant 'bumps' or exostosis on the foot - especially the forefoot and top of the midfoot. 




John Fluevog Hopefuls Rosy


This is a great boot and I love the low heel, thick and rigid sole and the gorgous color. Add a dress orthotic for more comfort and it's a winner. 

This Boot Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild to moderate Bunions
*Mild to moderate Hammertoes
*Mild to moderate Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Morton's Neuroma
*Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Over-Pronation (wear a dress orthotic)
*Hypermobility (wear a dress orthotic)

This Boot NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint) 
*Severe Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Diabetics  
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*Charcot Foot
*History of Ulcerations







Alegria Cami


Excellent boot! Please see my complete review of the Alegria boots (2 blog posts previous to this one, which you can find by scrolling back or typing 'Alegria' in the search box at the upper right hand corner). Wear a dress orthotic for maximum comfort and this is a boot that will work for almost any foot type. 





Camper Filippa Low


I don't own this boot and have not seen it in person but I love the look and it seems to meet all the criteria. The wedge heel should stop motion in the forefoot are and, if you know that you can handle this heel height, it should be comfortable. The reviews also state that it works well for women with a wider calf. 

This Boot Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Mild Plantar Fasciits (Heel Pain)
*Women who know that they can wear this heel height comfortably.

This Boot NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Charcot Foot
*Diabetics
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*History of Ulcerations
*Balance Issues
*Hypermobility or Instability
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Severe Osteoarthritis of any of the toe joints
*Large 'bumps' or exostosis on the foot
*High arches with 'bump' or exostosis on the top of the foot
*Severe Haglund's Deformity
*Recovering from a Lisfrac's Fracture
*Metatarsalgia
*Capsulitis
*Plantar Plate Injury





Alegria Raina

This is the boot that I wore on my eleven day walking vacation of Paris and it passed with flying colors. For more information and a full review of the Alegria boots, please go to the search box and type in Alegria. I did a blog post (2 previous to this blog post) where I talk about these two boots in detail. 

Overall, excellent boot and I paid $29 on 6pm.com. 




Ariat Fatbaby

I think I got these because I love saying that I'm wearing my 'Fatbabies'! This is an excellent boot and I wear them under black slacks or jeans and they look professional and feel great. The Fatbaby boot does have a full length shank in it but I did notice that there is still a little bit of flexion in the sole, which was a disappointment because I am a stickler for no motion in the sole of a shoe BUT, with my dress orthotic and my mild Hallux Limitus, it still works very nicely for all day wear.  

Ariat Fatbaby is Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild to possibly severe Bunions
*Mild to possibly severe Hammertoes
*Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Morton's Neuroma
*Metatarsalgia
*Capsulitis
*Patients recovering from a Lisfranc's Fracture
*Plantar Plate Injury
*Osteoarthritis
*Mild to possibly severe Rheumatoid Arthritis (Clear with your Podiatrist)
*Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Mild to severe Over-Pronation (wear dress orthotics)
*Mild to moderate Hypermobility (wear with dress orthotics)

Ariat Fatbaby is NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Charcot Foot
*Achilles Tendonitis (these patients need a slightly higher heel lift in the back - such as a low wedge to decrease tension on the Achilles)
*Diabetic (Clear this boot with your Podiatrist)
*History of Ulcerations
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Clear with your Podiatrist)
*Peripheral Neuropathy/Nerve Damage (Clear with your Podiatrist)






Tsubo Descari

I love the Tsubo brand. This ankle is a bit high on the wedge but I wanted to add it because I love the Tsubo thick, rigid soles and I particularly like the soft adjustable strap across the midfoot area. This boot will not work if you have Hallux Limitus, Hallux Rigidus or any serious forefoot issues because the wedge is too steep of an incline, which will put too much pressure to the forefoot structures. If you know you can wear a heel this height comfortably, the forefoot sole has enough rigidity and cushion to give added protection to the forefoot structures. I was able to wear the Tsubo Heels at this height for many years and, as I got older, my feet were not able to tolerate it anymore. The trick is to listen to your body and if your feet hurt or if you are compensating or changing your gait in any way - don't wear them because they are causing damage.

This Boot Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Mild Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Women who know they can wear this heel height comfortably.

This Boot NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Charcot Foot
*Diabetics
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*History of Ulcerations
*Balance Issues
*Hypermobility or Instability
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Osteoarthritis of any of the toe joints
*Severe Haglund's Deformity
*Recovering from a Lisfrac's Fracture
*Metatarsalgia
*Capsulitis
*Plantar Plate Injury






Fly London Mux Boot




Fly London Yust Boot





Fly London Yink Boot

These three Fly London boots are a nice combination of style and comfort. Once again, they are not going to work for everyone but if you know that you can wear a heel this height comfortably - these boots should work for you. 

Fly London Boots Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild to possibly moderate Bunions
*Mild to possibly moderte Hammertoes
*Mild Morton's Neuromas
*Mild Metatarsalgia
*Mild Capsulitis
*Mild Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Mild Over-Pronation (wear a dress orthotic)
*Mild Hypermobility (wear a dress orthotic)
*Healed Lisfranc's Injury (Check with your Pod)

Fly London Boots NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Charcot Foot
*Diabetics
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*History of Ulcerations
*Balance Issues
*Severe Hypermobility or Instability
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Severe Osteoarthritis of any of the toe joints
*Large 'bumps' or exostosis on the foot
*High arches with 'bump' or exostosis on the top of the foot
*Severe Haglund's Deformity






Women's Ladies Wedge Platform
Lace Up Round Toe Low Heel Boots

Yes, that is actually the official name on ebay. I like the thick rigid sole and, once again, if you know that you are able to wear a low wedge heel comfortably, this boot should work well for you. I also like the fact that you can loosen the laces to adjust for ankle and calf size. At the price of $39 - this is a great option for anyone on a budget. 

This Boot Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild Bunions
*Mild Hammertoes
*Mild Morton's Neuromas
*Mild Metatarsalgia
*Mild Capsulitis
*Mild Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Achilles Tendonitis
*Mild Over-Pronation (wear a dress orthotic)
*Mild Hypermobility (wear a dress orthotic)

This Boot NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Charcot Foot
*Diabetics
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*History of Ulcerations
*Balance Issues
*Severe Hypermobility or Instability
*Hallux Rigidus (No motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Severe Osteoarthritis of any of the toe joints
*Large 'bumps' or exostosis on the foot
*High arches with 'bump' or exostosis on the top of the foot
*Severe Haglund's Deformity






Fit Flop Mukluk Moc 2




Fit Flop Crush Boot


The Fit Flop boots are fabulous! They have the thick, rigid sole that does not bend or flex, a soft and wide toebox, good rearfoot control and you can add a dress orthotic to it for arch control. The only issue with this boot is that they don't come in half sizes so I would recommend sizing up and some patients have issues with pulling them on since they do not have a zipper. Overall, an excellent boot. 

Fit Flop Boots (above) Recommended for Patients with:
*Mild to Severe Bunions
*Mild to Severe Hammertoes
*Morton's Neuroma
*Metatarsalgia
*Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion of the 1st toe joint)
*Hallux Rigidus
*Rheumatoid Arthritis
*Osteoarthritis
*Capsulitis
*Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Achilles Tendonitis
*Mild to Moderate Over-Pronation (wear a dress orthotic)
*Mild to Moderate Hypermobility (wear a dress orthotic)
*Mild to Moderate Tendonitis (wear dress orthotic)
*Recovering from a previous Lisfranc's Injury or fracture 

Fit Flop Boots NOT Recommended for Patients with:
*Charcot Foot
*History of Ulcerations 

Fit Flop Boots MAY works for Patients with:
(Get Approval from your Podiatrist!):
*Diabetics
*Peripheral Areterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*History of Ulcerations


I hope this was helpful and I would love to hear any feedback that you have on these boots - or other great boots that you think should be on the list. 


Happy New Years!

Dr. Cathleen A. McCarthy

:)


******

I'f you're into detective stories - check out my book 'Gunning For Angels' which was written under my pen name C. Mack Lewis. It's available on Kindle or in paperback. 

Warning: Adult Content

























48 comments:

Nicole said...

What do you think about the Sanita Ditto?

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Excellent!
:)

Anonymous said...

Hello,

What do you think of the
Gravity Defyer shoe?

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Anonymous,
I like the Gravity Dyfyer shoes. I wish the sole was more rigid but I love the fact that they have hidden springs. Great for heel pain BUT they would be better if the sole was more rigid and had less bend and flex.
Cathy
:)

Anonymous said...

I enjoy your blog. I have terrible foot pain and cannot find any comfortable shoes. I agree with you about the Crocs relief as they are one of the few I can tolerate. I need a shoe that is firm yet cushioned and have not been able to find an ideal one. I mostly wear Easy Spirit Traveltime and find them more tolerable than other shoe I can wear away from home. My question is, why do some Podiatrists recommend flexible shoes instead of rigid ones? I even read an article on Web MD this morning that recommended shoes that flex at the toes for people with problem feet. Also, can you recommend a shoe that is firm yet cushy? I have trouble with sneakers that lace up because I have pain on the tops of my feet also. Thank you.

Gwen said...

Your blog is just the most amazing resource! I will consult your recommended shoes before ever buying another pair.
Quick question on which Crocs Rx you recommend for slippers...I have a history of broken metatarsals in both feet (1 needed pinning) and I need to find an alternative to my Hafflingers. I LOVE cork soled slippers and shoes, but my toenails make holes in the wool. Really, they're not long though! Thanks for your fabulous blog!

thansen85 said...

Hello,
I feel like I have planter fascistic
and have tried so many different shoes Danskos, different ones, Algeria diffrent ones, Born, Keen, and Wolky. The arches in shoes also hurt my feet. I take Lyrica for fibromyalgia I thought this would help my the nerve pain, but it has not. I feel like they are so ridged. I am 46 and work in an office setting. I have tried and sent back so many shoes trying to find one that will work. I have very tight hamstrings and bursitis in my hip. I feel these are partly from shoes issues. Is there anything else you would recommend for office shoes.I have tried many inserts, cortisone shots and seen many different podiatrists and not sure what to do any more. I do were the RX crocs on the weekend. Any advice or tips would be great.

thansen85 said...

Hello,
I feel like I have planter fascistic
and have tried so many different shoes Danskos, different ones, Algeria diffrent ones, Born, Keen, and Wolky. The arches in shoes also hurt my feet. I take Lyrica for fibromyalgia I thought this would help my the nerve pain, but it has not. I feel like they are so ridged. I am 46 and work in an office setting. I have tried and sent back so many shoes trying to find one that will work. I have very tight hamstrings and bursitis in my hip. I feel these are partly from shoes issues. Is there anything else you would recommend for office shoes.I have tried many inserts, cortisone shots and seen many different podiatrists and not sure what to do any more. I do were the RX crocs on the weekend. Any advice or tips would be great.

Elizabeth said...

Are you doing something different with your blog? The search function only works about half the time, and I no longer receive your updates via email. I tried to resubscribe but was told I was already a subscriber -- yet I have not rec'd this or an earlier newsletter. ??

Anonymous said...

I notice none of your boots is appropriate for charcot foot. What are those of us with CMT, high arches, and slight hammertoes supposed to wear?

Anonymous said...

I have a bunion and hammertoe on my right foot, and wide forefeet. I got 2 pairs of Clark boots this year, both with rubber soles and only a slightly raised heel, and am loving them. I think they're both in the Whistle line.

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Anonymous,
Great question! I think that the sources that are recommending shoes that flex have good intentions - they're unknowingly giving bad advice.

Being a Podiatrist, I have an advantage in that I have spent the last 13 years in private practice treating patient's foot pain and I have the unique advantage of seeing what works and what doesn't. The theories that I use are not common knowledge - even in Podiatry. I remember in Podiatry school they would tell us to tell patients to 'wear good shoes' but they never actually told us the defination of a good shoe. Over the years, I've built my biomechanical theories (based on listening to patients about what works for them and by thinking about WHY certain things work and others don't) and my success rate with patients soared. I have a sub-specialty in my practice of treating patients who have had multiple foot and ankle surgeries and cortisone injections and are still having pain. Within 2-3 visits, using proper shoegear, CMO's, occasionally bracing and by changing simple habits - they are dramatically improved.

In answer to your shoe questions, I would add a CMO or a great OTC insert (like Footsteps) to the Easy Spirit Traveltime for more comfort. I tend to only recommend the Traveltime to more geriatric sedentary patients. If you are younger and more active, you need less motion through the forefoot area. Also, try the Crocs Mammouth around the house as a bedroom slipper - they are fleece lined and offer support and soft lining.

For sneakers, I would try the New Balance 1540 (skip a lace so that there is less pressure on the top of your foot) and for summer the Wolky sandals (Ruby, Tulip, Jewel or Cloggy) and the Croc Mammouth for around the house. Try them on at the store so that you can make sure none of the straps hit the top of your foot in an area that hurts.

Have a great day!
Cathy
:)

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Gwen,
Thank you for the kind words!

The Hafflingers with cork base are pretty darn good - as long as it has rearfoot control and the base doesn not bend or flex.

The three things I recommend for bedroom slippers are:
1. RX Croc clogs with the strap to the back (also, Crocs mammouth which has enough of a lip in the back to help hold the heel in and is also fleece lined).
2. Birkenstock sandals (with a strap in the back)
3. The Orthoheel Diabetic slipper, which does not have a strap in the back BUT, if the first 2 choices aren't working for you then I can approve this slipper - especially for older and more sedentary patients who can't reach their feet to put on a shoe with a strap.

Thanks for reading!
Cathy
:)

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Thansan85,
I'm sorry to hear that you're having so much trouble with your feet. You've definately got more issues when we start talking about fibromyalgia, hip issues and it sounds like you have tried a lot of good shoes that did not work for you.

The basics for you are:
1. RX Crocs or Crocs Mammouth around the house as a bedroom slipper.
2. New Balance 928, 1540 or 812 with an insert (either custom-molded or and over the counter like Footsteps) and if you are one of the 10% of people who cannot tolerate arch support then don't wear arch support.
3. Office wear - try the Wolky Cloggy. I know you've tried Wolky's before but I don't know if you tried this one.

Also, I would send you out for a Scanogram to evaluate for a possible limb length discrepancy because that is an easy fix with a heel lift on the shorter side. Scanograms are more accurate than manually measuring.

Also, I would recommend discussing with your Doctor a RX for Metanx, which is a prescription strength Vitamin that helps with neuropathic pain and chronic pain syndromes.

That's a start. If you are ever in town, please make an appointment and bring in ONE bag of shoes that you wear the most so we can do a full evaluation. Don't give up! There is always an answer and if you don't find it with one Doc - get a second and a third opinion because you are worth it and there is always an answer.

Hope that was helpful!
Cathy
:)

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Elizabeth,
Sorry for the computer problems! I didn't change anything that I know about but I'm also not the most computer saavy person out there.
I'll see what I can do...
Cathy
:)

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Anonymous,
Charcot patients need custom-molded shoes that are an RX specifically to their feet. They often also need built in Ankle-Foot Orthosis to control motion.

I assume that if you have CMT that you are wearing an ankle-foot orthosis? CMT patients need shoes that have a thick, protective sole but is LIGHT because of the muscle weakness and foot drop condition. It depends a lot on your age, level of activity, weight and a variety of other factors. A very general recommendation for a walking shoe is the New Balance 812 because it can accommodate an AFO and has a protective sole but is also light. I highly recommend that you find a Pod in your area - assuming you don't already have one - and discuss this with him or her. Proper shoes and bracing are very important to keeping you living an active healthy life and any Podiatrist should be able to help you with this.

I hope that was helpful,
Cathy
:)

thansen85 said...

Dear Cathy, Thanks you so much for your information. I will continue to work on things. DO you still recommend that I stay with a ridged shoe? I have seen gravity defyer, what do you think.

thansen85 said...

Sorry one more question.... What shoe do would you recommend for me for running?

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Thansen85,
Not RIDGED - I'm recommending a RIGID soled shoes. Hopefully that was a misspelling and not a miscommunication?

You need a thick and RIGID soled shoe - a shoe that does not bend or flex and has a wide base. I would recommend that you try either the New Balance 928 or 1540. They are both better than the Gravity Defyer.

Cathy
:)

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Thansen85,
For running - New Balance 1540.
Cathy
:)

Adam said...

Nice Review... Podiatrist should have a idea about shoes to enhance their practice..I mean being in the know which ones to avoid. Wellington Florida Podiatrist

KimB said...

This is a great list and I've just found your blog today as I desperately search for shoes that fit my feet comfortably. Unfortunately, I don't see anything on this list that might fit the bill for me. I have an exostosis on the top of my foot, about halfway between the base of my big toe and ankle. I also have narrow heels, and tall big toes so I need a tall toe box. It's really hard to find something to accommodate all three issues. I live in a place where I can wear casual sandals only four months of the year. It's very discouraging to shop for shoes and I always end up wearing something that is way too sloppy or kills my feet. I would be eternally grateful if you have any ideas. Thanks so much!

ds said...

Do you have any suggestions on footwear for someone with surgically corrected clubbed feet? Thank you.

Chloe said...

What do you think about the lighter-soled Frye styles? I've noticed that some of them, including the ones you've shown here, have a very heavy sole that I usually have trouble with. I have bony lumps on the tops of my feet (I think the word is exostosis?), and they get aggravated by wearing heavy-soled shoes- Danskos are really uncomfortable for me. I also have a weak ankle from an old injury, so I avoid shoes that have a heavy sole unless they are also very supportive around the ankle. Lace-ups are best, because they can be loosened around the top of my foot where the lumps are but tight around the ankle for support. I'm thinking about replacing my very worn out but most comfortable lace up ankle boots (Ariat paddock boots) with Frye Carson lace-ups.

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Thanks Adam,
It's always great to hear from another Pod!
Cathy
:)

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Is this Adam Katz?
Great to hear from you!
I hope all is well and aren't you glad we both live outside of the polar vortez??
Cathy
:)

Anonymous said...

Thanks Dr.! Happy New Year to you too!

Anonymous said...

I'm looking for a tall boot without a wedge heel that meets the thick and rigid sole requirement. I went to all the shoe stores in my area today and not a single one, no matter how expensive, had a thick and rigid sole. Sheesh! I did find the Dansko Bethany boot online. What do you think about this boot?

Anonymous said...

Thank, thank you, thank you for your blog. I have RA, and am also a severe overpronator, I had hyprocure surgery last year, which has been helpful. I have a number of the shoes you recommend, but recently the Naot Kirei caught my eye, have you reviewed that shoe?

Also, I wear orthotics all the time, and wear my NB 860 in the house as slippers. Do you have any recommendations for slippers for those of us that need orthotics?

Thanks!

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for writing this blog!! I've recently had surgery for Halux rigidus and had surgery 10 years ago ont eh other foot for Halux and a bunionette. I've been struggling for years to find comfortable byut stylish shoes. I was sooooo happy to run across your blog today. THANK YOU!!! My podiatrist is awesome, but he's a man... His advice for me on shoes is a rigid sole too. But he rarely has shopping tips for me! Ronda

terry said...

Hey there!
Just thought I would tell you that
I enjoyed your shoe reviews! AWESOME!!!

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Kim B,

I'm sorry for the delayed response! You've got a tough foot to fit. For the summer, I would recommend the Wolky Tulip, Jewel or Ruby. If the strap hits the exostosis, you can get 1/4 inch self adhesive felt or moleskin and create offloading of the exostosis on the underside of the strap. This will create a "sweetspot" for the exostosis so that the strap doesn't rub on it. I recommend going to the store and trying on the one that feets the best.

Also, try the Naot Paris, Alyssa, Deluxe. or Reserve.

Hope that was helpful!
Let me know how it works out,
Cathy
:)

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Oops Kim B,
Sorry, you were asking for recommendations on enclosed shoes and not sandals!

You need a shoe with an 'extra depth toebox' and a dress orthotic so that it can 'cradle' the rearfoot and take up some room in back of the shoe. For the exostosis, you can get a 1/4 inch self adhesive felt pad and create a 'donut pad' that you place on the inside of the shoe to create a 'sweetspot' for the exostosis so there is no pressure on it. Also, you can take your shoe to a Cobbler and have them stretch the leather over the exostosis.

I would recommend New Balance 928 with an orthotic for your walking shoe. Skip a lace over the exostosis to relieve pressure. It also has an extra depth toe box.

Try the Ariat Fatbaby, which you can wear under jeans and black slacks. Stretch the leather on top with a Cobbler or put in the donut pad for off-loading.

Sorry for the confusion,
Cathy
:)

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi ds,
Sorry for the delayed response! Clubfoot patients feet can be difficult to fit but I would reocmmend getting a extra-depth (maybe even custom molded) orthopedic shoe. It depens on the severity of the deformity. I don't have a specific recommendation because I'd have to see and evaluate your foot. Have you tried talking to your local Podiatrist or Pedorthist?
I'm sorry I don't have something more specific,
Cathy
:)

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Dear Chloe,
A lighter Frye boot is fine as long as the sole is rigid. I have not seen the Frye Carson in person so I am not sure how much bend it has across the forefoot area. I do have patients who find light shoes with a thinner sole but the sole has absolutely no bend or flex. Finding a light shoe with a rigid sole is a challenge but they are out there. I'm sorry that I don't have a specific recommendation for you. It does have excellent reviews on zappos and that is a good sign! Also, skip a lace over the exostosis - it makes a huge difference!
Thank you for reading and I'm sorry for the delayed response!
Cathy
:)

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Anonymous,

Regarding the Naot Kirei, I am not sure this is the right choice for you since you have RA. I haven't seen the shoe in person so I am not sure - but the sole looks a little flimsy. If the sole bends or flexes at all (especially in the forefoot area), it is not good enough for you. If the sole happens to be rigid and not flexible, it should be okay (with your orthotic) for light wear.

For a bedroom slipper, I usualy recommend the RX Crocs, Birkenstock sandals or Orthoheel Diabetic Slipper (this one is for geriatrics) but none of these accommodate an orthotic. With your history of RA, I would recommend still using a NB with orthotics as a slipper. Have you tried the New Balance 918, 1540 or 812? In my opinion, all three of these are more protective than the 860. Next time you are in the store, try them on and judge for yourself which one is most comfortable.

Hope all is well and thank you for reading!
Cathy
:)

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Anonymous,

I do like the Dansko Bethany but I wish it had a wider toebox! It is hard to find a flat boot with a thick rigid sole but one option is that you can take the boot to a Cobbler and have them add a full length shank and thicker sole on the bottom. Many of my cowboy patients do this to their boots and it works well.

Doc Martin boots typically have thick, rigid and flat soles. Also, look up the Tsubo Kison and the Tsubo boot collection in general. Not all Tsubo boots have a thick and rigid sole but most of them do. It's hard to tell until you see the boot in person and can check them.

Hope that was helpful!
Cathy
:)

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Thank you Rhonda!
You made my day,
Cathy
:)

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Thanks Terry!
:)

Anonymous said...

ationirnp andHi, I have been use to wearing high heels about 3" to 4" because my husband is so tall. Last year I had a couple of falls(wearing flats, I might add :) Due to my breaks etc. I have been told to wear large toe box shoes with heels of 2-2 1/2 ". Please recommend the most stylish shoes you can - I was a shoe addict and thank the Lord my dear daughter-in-law wore my size. Thank you and any one who can help a newcomer will be my BFF :) JB

Anonymous said...

Thanks so much for your blog and your advice. As much as I would love to be out of the NB runners, especially in the house, now I know where to look when I need to buy new shoes that aren't runners!

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Anonymous,
For thebest dress shoes, go to the search box and put in 'Top 20 Comfort Dress Shoes' and I have two lists of top dress shoes. Also, I have a list of Top 20 comfort sandals and boots. You can also simply scroll through until you see something you like - I have three years of shoe choices!
Hope that was helpful,
Cathy
:)

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Anonymous,
Thanks for the kind words and thanks for reading!
Cathy
:)

Anonymous said...

Hi Dr. Cathy :)

First of all, I'm a huge fan of your blog and It's been a great resource for me to find out shoes for my aching feet! Secondly, congratulations on publishing your first novel! It's quite an accomplishment!

So the reason I came out of lurking today was because I recently got diagnosed with mild bunions, heel spurs and arthritis (the doctor mentioned this was mild and physio and massage therapy should help). I am also an overpronator. Prior to diagnosis, I've tried shoes recommended in your blog, particularly those with rocker bottom soles. I have a pair of Naot Divines and owned a Jambu wedge, and 3 pairs from the Dansko Sausalito collection. Though the shoes were comfortable and not painful at all, I find that the rocker soles would cause my feet to turn sideways (from over pronation maybe?). I stopped wearing rocker soles, due to the risk of twisting my ankle and not needing to be too conscious or careful with the way I walk.

For now, I have been wearing my Doc Martens and my Fluevog LoF Maggies (I am a total Fluevog fan). I haven't been falling since then, but I find that my feet get tired faster and I get slight shin pain. It seems like I have to choose between falling or comfort! I'm thinking about seeing a podiatrist (I saw a sports medicine doctor) and seeing if I need an orthotic (my sports med doctor said the orthotic isn't urgently necessary).

Aside from the thick sole, arch support, rear foot control and roomy toe box, what other things should I look for in a shoe for someone with my condition? Should I give up rocker soles or simply "learn to walk" in them? Can I still wear heels or wedges (prior to diagnosis, I was primarily a heel-wearer - so you can see how heartbreaking this is for me!)? What sort of brands/shoes do you recommend, if any come to mind?

Thank you so much for reading this! Sorry it's such a long post!


Katie

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Katie,
Thanks for reading and thanks for the kind words!

From what you are saying, I would suspect that the rocker bottom shoes are not for you. They aren't for eveyone and if they are causing balance issues, I would recommend that you discontinue wearing them. With rocker bottom soled shoes, you should be able to put them on and (even if they feel a little wierd) they should feel fabulous and give instant relief. If they hurt or cause balance issues - they are too aggressive for you.

As far as heels go, I would recommend sticking to a low wedge heel with a thick and rigid sole, wide toebox and rearfoot control. I would highly recommend that you consider adding a custom-molded dress orthotic or a heat-molded dress insert to the shoes to control the arch. Proper arch support should stop or slow the progression of the bunion. I would highly recommend that you avoid surgery if possible and continue to focus on good shoes and a good pair of dress orthotics. Check with your insurance to see if they cover orthotics. Also, as CMO's can be expensive, there are many less expensive alternatives such as heat-molded inserts or even over-the-counter arch support. If it's an option, I would recommend that you go with a custom-molded dress orthotic from your local Podiatrist.

You've already named some excellent brands! The ones that come to mind are: Dansko, Fluevog, Allegria, Naot, Tsubo and Jambu. Did you check out my 'Top 25 comfort dress shoe' list? I think I have two of them.

I hope that helps!
Cathy
:)

Anonymous said...

Thank you SO MUCH for your response, Dr. Cathy! :)

I recently bought a pair of Fitflop sneakers and Alegria Caiti boots. I wore my FitFlop sneakers on a night out and did not feel any pain nor fell over due to balance issues! Now I can see the hype over this brand! The best part: they shoes definitely fit my aesthetic. I really hope FitFlop makes more shoes!

As for Alegria: in the store, I did not feel out of balance at all. I know they supposedly have a rocker sole, but unlike the rocker soles I've tried on, these ones did not make me feel like the side of my foot is about to twist. It was comfortable and I can walk in them!

What I noticed is that both shoes have at least an inch (or inch and a half) platform all the way. No "heel" of some kind. Perhaps that's what I need to be comfortable! The rocker soles I've worn in the past have a bit of a heel/incline and have a higher platform (at least 2 inches) and they made my foot turn sideways. I will probably just have to suck it up and reserve heels for formal occasions and look into getting a dress orthotic.

Thank you THANK YOU Dr. Cathy for your responses and your blog. :) I'm definitely looking forward to more of your articles!

Fred Haro said...

congratulations guys, quality information you have given!!! Orthotic Shoes

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi ANonymous,
I'm so glad the FitFLops shoes and Allegria are working for you! Once you know what you are looking for - they are out there! And once you get used to your feet not hurting - you can't go back to uncomfortable shoes.
Thanks for reading!
Cathy
:)