Featured Post

Thinking About Foot Surgery? Ten Things You Need To Think About BEFORE You Have Foot Surgery.

Ten Things You Need To Think About BEFORE  You Have Foot Surgery. 1. You need to exhaust conservative treatment before you decide...

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

My Feet Hurt!! Top Ten Things Relieve Foot Pain Today...

My Feet Hurt!


Top Ten Things 
To Relieve Foot Pain Today...



The following advice may not be popular but it is highly effective! 
It's straight forward, common sense medicine and --
it sure beats surgery! 

Give it a try and I would love to hear how it works for you...



1.

Stop Walking Barefoot.
Forget about what people say about being barefoot being "natural" -- being naked is "natural" but we all wear clothes to protect our bodies from the elements.
It's wise to protect your feet also. 
There's nothing "natural" about walking around on concrete all day!
Plus, if your feet weren't hurting, 
you wouldn't be reading this.



2.

Stop Wearing Flip-Flops.
Zero biomechanical control.
Try an experiment -- have someone video you on their cell phone from behind as you walk barefoot or wear flip-flops.
Now video you doing the same thing while wearing proper shoes with arch support.
Pay attention to what is happening to your feet, ankles and knees.
Not pretty, is it?
Lots of extra wear-and-tear on your joints, muscles and tendons.  
Remember, you're either beating up your feet -- 
or you're beating up your shoes.
If you think what you're shoes look like after several years of wear, 
what do you think is happening to your joints?
 



3.

Stop Walking Around the House Wearing Only Socks.
Minimal protection!
Zero biomechanical control. 
Although I do recommend wearing socks with shoes, if you are walking around the house in only socks -- that is only slightly better than being barefoot. 



4.

Stop Wearing Flimsy Bedroom Slippers.
If your slippers are flexible or bend too easily, 
you may be causing damage to your joints as well as setting you up for potential injury.
If you like to wear slippers in the house, 
at least look into getting"Diabetic Slippers" 
even if you are not diaabetic. 
These slippers offer more protection and are probably ten times more comfortable. 
Foot Solutions has a great Diabetic Slipper 
and you can find many others online. 



5.

Around the house - as a bedroom slipper - 
wear Crocs RX clogs 
with the strap to the back.
Do you have heel pain? 
Knee, hip, lower back pain?
This is the cheapest and best medical advice you will ever get!!
If you wear Croc Rx Clogs with the strap to the back around the house, you will probably have a significant improvement 
in a very short period of time. 
The only time you should be barefoot and standing is in the shower! 



6.

For a great Walking Shoe - 
go to a New Balance Store and purchase a 
New Balance Walking Shoe 
with Roll-Bar Technology 
and a wide base with an extra-depth toebox.
I often write my patients prescriptions for this shoe, which can make it tax deductible and give them a 10% discount at any New Balance store. 
I truly believe that proper shoes are medically necessary for many patients because it will decrease pain, risk of injury and prevent surgery. 
Not to mention make your life more pleasant because you will have less pain and you can concentrate on staying active and having fun! 




7.

Elevate and Rest Your Feet 
and use a topical pain reliever like: 
Biofreeze or Traumeel -
both are over-the-counter and safe. 
Don't underestimate the power of rest!
As a physician, I am always amazed at the body's healing power so --
at the end of the day, 
grab a good book and put those feet up... 


8.

Wear Arch Support.
Either Custom-Molded Orthotics or 
a good Over-The-Counter Insert
which you can purchase from your local Podiatrist or your local running shoe store.  
Ten percent of people cannot tolerate arch support, which means you have a ninety percent chance that arch support can improve your life.
I wish Las Vegas had those odds! 
Good arch support can also significantly help with knee, hip and lower back pain.
I've had patients say, 
"I have high arches -- I don't need arch support"
and my response is, 
"Bridges have arches but engineers design them with struts for support."
It's the same with your foot -- 
support under the arch means less strain on the joints, tendons and muscles. 
Custom molded orthotics from your Podiatrist are far superior to over-the-counter inserts but, if you are constrained by a budget, at least get the over-the-counter inserts so that you get some degree of arch support.

9.

Wear Diabetic Socks 
for extra cushion 
and comfort. 
It sounds silly but I've been to lectures entitled "Current Technological Advances in Socks and
Sock Strategy."
Proper socks can decrease friction and thereby decrease calluses, corns, blisters and 
heel fissures. 
Diabetic socks may cost a couple dollars more but hopefully will be well worth it! 

 



10.

Make an Appointment with your 
local Podiatrist!
Try to find a Podiatrist that specializes in conservative, non-surgical treatment. 
In my opinion, less than five percent of patients with foot pain need surgery. I am not referring to foot "procedures" that can be done in the office such as fixing ingrown toenails -- I am referring to more serious surgeries such as bunions and fusions of joints that will permanently change your foot and ankle biomechanics.
Foot surgery is more than you think!
The foot heals slower, hurts more, and swells more because while you are trying to heal it -- 
you are walking on it!
Not to mention, recovering from foot surgery poses many risks and the results are never guarenteed.
I always tell my patients that 
the goal of surgery is 
to take an "abnormal painful foot" and turn it into an "abnormal non-painful foot."
The only time you should consider having foot surgery is if you have tried everything and completely exhausted conservative treatment and you cannot perform your normal daily activities because of the pain.
Before you have foot surgery, please get a second or even third opinion!
 Most biomechanical foot pain can be resolved using conservative, non-surgical treatment. 



***


For more information, 
please see the article on this blog for:

Shoe Recommendations for Patients Recovering from Lisfranc's Injuries.
(Continue to Scroll Down)


On this Blog, you can also look up:


Top Ten Comfortable Sandals
Top Twenty Comfortable Dress Shoes
Top Five Comfortable Walking Shoes
Top Twenty Womens Comfortable Boots


Please feel free to explore the blog!
I have lots of information, articles and shoe recommendations for people who suffer from foot pain.




Have a Great Day!

Dr. Cathleen A. McCarthy


:)











42 comments:

Jen in NY said...

My question to the podiatrist is: Do the Crocs that she suggests wearing around the house harbor bacteria? The reason I ask is that I've had leg cellulitis, likely due to bacteria entering an open cut under my toe. I used to wear flip-flops around the house, but I've read they are bacteria magnets, so I figure clean socks are the best thing to wear.

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Jen,
I'm sorry to hear that you've been suffering from cellulitis. I hope you are getting better! Crocs can harbor bacteria as well as fungus (just like any other shoe) but I would still recommend them. You can wear them with socks for added comfort and you can clean them at least once a week with soap and water. The great thing about Crocs is they re plastic and easy to clean.
I hope this was helpful and I wish you the best!
Dr. Cathleen A McCarthy

B said...

I had no idea that socks could cause blisters and such. I've had a nice little friend on my toe for years and havn't been able to get rid of it, even with changing to better shoes. Never even thouht that it could be the socks!

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Another crazy little thing that can help are the sports or diabetic socks that have individual little compartments for each toe -- like gloves. Patients with problem or painful toes with corns or blisters seem to love these. Hope it works for you!
Dr Cathleen A McCarthy
:)

Catherine said...

The Crocs that Dr. McCarthy recommended are "classic crocs" and can be cleaned with warm water and soap. I have a pair and they do not smell and dry off very quickly. They do lose tread after daily wear and become very slick.

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Catherine,
You are exactly right! THe Classic Crocs can lose their tread with daily wear and should be replaced at least once a year. Also, living in Arizona, I do not recommend wearing them outside in the summer -- particularly when it's 120 degrees as the plastic can melt on asphalt! We have an excessive heat warning in effect today and it's only May!
Hope all is well,
Cathy McCarthy

Medical Products said...

Buy wonderful foot pain products Here..

Foot Solution said...

Thanks Dr. Cathleen it really helped looking forward for more.

Heel Pain Relief

Anonymous said...

Just an fyi but you can throw the Crocs in the wash on cold and air dry them. Done it plenty of times with the whole family's with no problems!
-Lisa

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Thanks Lisa!
Also, if you live in Arizona - don't put them in outside in direct sunlight in the summer to dry because they will shrink to toddler size! Guess how I found that out...
Cathy
:)

Alice said...

Nice tips to keep feet healthy.

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Thank you, Alice!
:)

Hollie Truesdale said...

These are some great tips for people that are experiencing foot pain. I've seen in a few articles now that people recommend not wearing flip flops because they don't support your feet at all. However, I think there are some better flip flops out there that are at least a little more cushioned. I wear mine occasionally, but not all the time. I like having support for my feet. http://familyfootanklephysicians.com/foot-care/

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Hollie,
There are some flip-flops that are better than other flip-flops (such as the Fit-Flop), but adding a strap to the back really does help decrease mechanical strain and make it more comfortable for all day wear. If you like the flip-flop look - check out the Fit-Flop sandals, which you can find in some stores and online.
Thanks for reading!
Cathy
:)

montrell hale said...

I don't know I kinda liked wearing my flip flops when I had plantar fasciitis. It seemed as if any shoe I wore was unconfrontable in some sort of way.. the only thing that really cured it was some product at a website I brought. I tried the splints ebsom salt taping and all the stretches I could find. so my advice to all is find a cure like I did and stop just treating it.www.howtocureplantarfasciitis.org/

Brenda Parker said...

Thank you for all of this great information! I'm currently dealing with a metatarsal stress fracture in my left foot, and am in an air cast for the next four weeks. Sounds like my days of wearing my cute, pointy-toed, 5" skinny-heeled pumps are going goodbye. I've been using your information to research new shoe options for work, as I need to wear business attire during the week. I just found that Tsubo has closed shop. I loved the shoes you posted in your blog, but cannot find them in my size (6-6.5, with narrow feet). I swear by Dansko clogs, but unfortunately they don't work for a business dress. Any other suggestions for someone in my situation? Many thanks!

-B

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Brenda,
So sad to see that Tsubo is taking a 'brief hiatus'! I hope that means they'll be back - they are one of my favorite shoe brands!
I'm sorry to hear that you've had a stress fracture. My patients who have narrow feet have a heck of a time finding shoes that fit well.
Option One:
Your best bet is to go to Nordstrom's (who carry narrow-sized shoes and have an amazing return policy) and ask the sales person that you are looking for a women's dress shoe (low-wedge) with a thick, rigid sole and a wide base and rearfoot control -- then ask her to show you what she recommends.
Option Two:
Your second best bet is to shop online at sites that specialize in narrow shoes and (use the 'image' button) to scroll through - look for low wedge heels with rearfoot control. If you find a shoe you like online, go to the Zappos website and check customer reviews on that particular shoe - they can be very helpful.
Option Three:
Third option, find a shoe that fits well and, if the sole is flexible, take the shoes to a shoe repair/cobbler and have them add a full length metal shank on the bottom of the shoe and build up the sole so it doesn't bend or flex.
Hope that was helpful and good luck!
Cathy
:)

Mandy Lin said...

christian louboutin pumps 12cm high heel sale online and free shipping http://www.clouboutinsneakers.com
Christian Louboutin 12CM Blue Patent Leather Pumps
Christian Louboutin 12CM Blue Patent Pointed Pumps
Christian Louboutin 12CM Blue Spike Leather Pointed Pumps

Anonymous said...

My condo strata bans the wearing of hard shoes on our flooring, so as not to disturb neighbours below. What indoor shoes/slippers would you recommend that are EXTREMELY quiet on hardwood or laminate, and also cheaper since it's yet an additional pair of shoes to purchase (I'm Canadian and most of us have a serious cultural thing against wearing outdoor shoes in private homes)? Would crocs fit the bill? But do crocs have a tendency to slip from the heel and then hit the floor as you walk (I have narrow heels, but wide forefeet)?

Thank you!

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Anonymous,
Wow! Tough condo!!
Top two choices for bedroom slippers:
1. Rx Crocs Relief, Ultimate Cloud or the Mammouth.
2. Vionix Relax Slipper (it doesn't have rearfoot control, but that is okay in this case)
Easy fix on the cultural concern -- only wear the bedroom slippers in the house.
Hope that was helpful!
Cathy
:)

Anonymous said...

Hi Dr McCarthy,

I've traveled abroad last year and did a lot of all day walking which I think left me with Marchers Fracture (my forefoot area still gets painful until now even with just a little walking). There was even one night then that I had to stop walking because of the severe pain in which I couldn't even take another step which never happened to me before.

I used a brand new Puma http://postimg.org/image/c4q054m85/
that was tight in the toe box and I was not used to walking and standing all day til night.

I'll be traveling by March again and will be doing the same walking and I plan on buying new shoes. I have new Nike Roshes but reading your recommendations makes me think twice about using them.

Aside from the New Balance you recommend are AirMax 90s ok too (I saw you recommended it for children's shoes)?

My other choices are also Adidas Tubular Radial/Nova or Asics Gel Lyte V.

Thanks! Am so glad that I found your very helpful blog!

Anonymous said...

Hi Doc,
Got classic high arches and narrow feet not to mention 4th toe on each foot is curled beneath the 3rd from birth.
Been to podiatrists, got supports which caused so much pain that I had to remove them. Been to hospital and told that structurally feet are normal which clearly they are not. Have inflammatory arthritis for good measure and now in so much pain daily it is hard to function.
One podiatrist was convinced I was not born with these feet but had surgery on them. When I told her that they had been mine from birth she virtually told me that was impossible.
Well since I have the impossible of my little legs I need some shoes I can wear for work, long hours, hard floors etc
Absolutely love walking with my dogs but can't keep pace anymore.
Heading towards middle age and possible insanity with the pain and am tired of constantly carrying pain relief everywhere.
Is there any any advice you can offer?
Must point out as in a wet climate, Ireland, open type shoes would not be suitable.
Have never worn heels or open sandals as very conscious of how feet look, never bare feet etc
Am due to attend a very important event soon which will involve lots of walking and am dreading the pain to come.

Lily said...

Dear Dr. McCarthy,
I have hallus valgus, hammer toes, a cuple of crooked toes next to one of the big toes which infrenges on their space, heel spurs, plantar fasciiatis,periheral neuropathy, which started after bad surgery, with burning and other unpleasant sensations in the feet and in below the knees legs, and flat feet. I have, in addition, a plain physical pain in the bunions and toes mostly when I wear the only thing I can - SAS snickers. I can make in them 100-200 feet with tolerable pain. The prostetic shoes' specialist told me that if the shoes won't, the fee ( pretty astronomical) will not be refundable.
Please, help me. First time I found on the Internet a Doctor like mine Doctors - compassionate and altruistic. I have an impression that they never sleep. If you can help me, I will be able to walk without pain in my feet in my house. I can't walk barefoot, I can't walk in slippers. I live alone. I need my feet.
Thank you. with great respect, Lilia

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hello Anonymous,
I am sorry for my delayed response!
High arches, narrow feet and the underlapping 4th toe?
Wow.
You definitely have what I call biomechanically challenged" feet. Finding shoes for a narrow foot can be difficult, but it is not impossible. I'm not sure what stores are in Ireland, so forgive me if I give you shoes that may only be available online. In your case, it is always best to go to the store to try to get the best fit.

Your arch supports might have caused pain because you tried to wear them in a shoe with a flexible sole. If you still have the inserts, then try them in one of the walking shoe recommendations below. If the inserts still hurt, it means that you are one of the 10% of people who cannot tolerate arch support. If that is the case, then try the over-the-counter arch supports Powerstep, which you can purchase online. If those don't work, you most likely are one of the 10% of people that can't tolerate arch support.

Here are my ideas for you:

Bedroom slippers:
1. Ugg boots with the thickest, most rigid sole you can find.
2. Crocs Mammoth (fleece lined)
3. Vionix Relax Slipper (excellent arch support but no rearfoot control.

Boots:
1. Alegria Boots (they tend to be wide but you can fill space with a SOFT insert with no arch support (like a odor eater insert) and thick socks. The sole is excellent and the toebox is wide enough to accommodate extra toe padding)
2. Find any boot that fits well and has a leather sole -- then take the boot to a Cobbler or Shoe Repair and ask them to put a full-length metal shank on the bottom of the boot and build up the sole so there is no motion. Get a wide toebox to accommodate extra padding for the toes). This might be your best option. Try it with only one pair of boots at first - to make sure it works.

Walking Shoes:
1. You can order the New Balance 928 in narrow sizes. If your high arch hits the top of the shoe, you can 'skip a lace' while lacing the shoe which will relieve pressure on your high arch.
2. Women's New Balance 1540.
3. Nike AirMax 90
4. Hoka One One Stinson ATR, which tend to run narrow. Skip a lace over your high arch.

I also recommend that you experiment with toe/hammertoe padding. The best way to find padding is to Google "toe padding" and then hit the "image" button, which will display a wide variety of toe pads. Scroll through and then start experimenting with what works for you. A great option is to get "Lamb's Wool" and tread it around the toes so that it keeps the toe from underlapping as much as possible. It's old school. but it works.

Just remember, the key to less foot pain is finding a shoe with a sole that does not bend or flex. The sole needs to be thick, rigid and non-flexible and wide at the base. Make sure the shoe has a wide toebox and rearfoot control.

I hope that was helpful and I wish you luck!!
Cathy
:)




Jane said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jane said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jane said...

Hello – sorry, I deleted my last two comments because they were filled with typos. So, anyway, I am a 43-year-old woman and have been suffering with a left foot injury since October. I had a lot of pain in my forefoot localized to the first metatarsal head. I attribute the injury to walking a lot of miles in flip-flops – stupid I know – and also many years of steep rocky trail running. I went through misdiagnosis after misdiagnosis for months. Finally I insisted on an MRI. It turns out that I have partial thickness tears in all five Plantar Plates. The doctor I saw recommended trying to get the ligaments to heal through rest and physical therapy. I see another specialist next month. I am struggling with footwear. All my shoes hurt me. I ordered and returned many shoes from Amazon in the hopes of finding something that would work. I tried a wide range of stiff sold running shoes per the suggestion of the doctor. They all feel terrible. I ordered Birkenstocks and they seem OK, but after reading your comments on other threads, I realize that they don't have a backstrap and my toes are still doing a lot of gripping. I do have custom orthotics, but the toe area is not super rigid. I just looked online to try to order some crocs, the ones you recommend, but they are out of stock everywhere. New balance doesn't usually fit my foot because I have a super narrow heal even though my forefoot is quite wide. Any suggestions? Any experience with this injury? Am I facing a permanent disability?

Jane said...

One last thing, I don't have any deformity like hammertoe or crossover toe at this point.

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Jane,
Sorry for the delayed response! Wow, torn plantar plates are rather serious injuries, but the good news is that there is no reason why you should be permanently disabled! Whether you have the surgery or not (and I recommend that you AVOID the surgery) -- you will always need to wear excellent shoes and inserts and protect your feet with Rx Crocs as bedroom slippers.

I would not recommend that you do any running until you are healed and, after you are healed, you may have to modify your sports activities to something that is easier on your feet like biking, swimming or walking. It is crucial that you always wear a shoe with an absolutely rigid, non-flexible sole and a wide base. The trick is to put cushion on top of the shoe with a rigid sole so you get more comfort. Sometimes, when patients say that a rigid soled shoe with a custom molded insert is still painful -- that means that they are not ready to get into shoes or they are too active. You may need more time in a CAM boot with more elevation and resting.

The keys to recovering from foot injuries is to:
1. Heal the foot (CAM walker, elevate, rest, ect)
2. After your foot has healed THEN you ease you back into normal activities while wearing excellent shoegear and inserts
3. You will need to modify exercise routine as you ease into more activites (i.e. you don't start with running. You start with the bike and then ease into walking and then perhaps running).

Some recommendations for you:

1. Rx Crocs Relief - if you can't find them online -- call our office at 480 563 5115 and they can arrange to mail you a pair. Ours are $50 and you pay for shipping. We do have a coupon on this blog that gives you 20% off for the Crocs if you want to use that -- it will be less expensive and you can get the same product. Whatever size you wear, order one-half to one whole size up.

2. Order the Hoke One One Stinson ATR, which is a running shoe and wear it with your inserts or an OTC insert like Powerstep. Your orthotics only control the rearfoot and the arch. Orthotics are never solid in the forefoot area - that is simply not how they are made and they would not work. The shoe needs to be rigid because that is what is controlling the entire foot, including the forefoot. The inserts are the icing, but the SHOE is the cake! The shoe is far more important than any orthotic!!

3. Try the MBT walking shoe, which will take all of the pressure off of the forefoot. This shoe doesn't work for everyone and you should not wear it if you have ever had any Achilles tendon issues. I recommend you try it on at the store and see if it works for you.

Good luck!! Please let me know how you are doing...
Cathy
:)

Jockson Rick said...

nice note.Foot Solutions is a leading international retailer specializing in personalized assessments, stylish high performance footwear and custom-crafted arch supports.heel spur

Stephanie said...

Hi. I am a teacher and have to stand/walk all day. My feet hurt so bad all over except for the toes. The pain shoots up to my legs. As soon as my feet hit the floor in the am I get shooting pain. I have a normal arch. Any advice? Thank you!

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Stephanie,
Sorry to hear that you are having foot pain!

A couple of options:
1. Allegria enclosed shoes with rearfoot control, which you can purchase from major retailers like Dillards. (i.e. the Allegria Paloma)
2. Dansko Profession Clogs worn with knee high compression hose 15 mmHG (black) to blend in with slacks (this is what I wear - plus a thin dress orthotic).
3. Nuclear option -- New Balance 928 (available in black in men's sizes) and wear an orthotic or the OTC arch support Powerstep and microfiber socks with extra cushioning. This look can be blended in with black slacks.

Around the house as a bedroom slipper -- get the Crocs Specialist (without vents) and make sure that your toes do not hit the front of the shoe because then you need to go to the next size up.

If the pain continues, please make an appointment with your local podiatrist for further evaluation.

Good luck and keep molding those little brains into future geniuses!
Cathy
:)

Wendy Schaffer said...

Not sure if my post worked - so trying again. I have a newly diagnosed 5th metatarsal fracture after a fall. I'm looking for a shoe/boot to sleep in besides the Ossur boot I was given (pain if I don't sleep with it and no sleep if I do!). I also am wondering what shoes I can wear for exercise bike/aqua exercises. I was told these are okay as long as I use a very supportive shoe. I tried exercise biking w/the boot on -but it was very bulky. I just don't want to do anything to hamper my recovery but I also want to stay in shape. Thanks so much! Wendy from NY

Anonymous said...

Top of t5he foot pain,heel pain and ball of the foot pain, I have 'em all and 63! I've been wearing orthotics for years but has not cured my flay feet and chronic Plantar Fasiatis. The pressure from the orthotics forcing the foot up in bad shoes has caused the top of the foot pain (tendonitis) from the pressure of laces. Ball of the foot pain from walking and dancing in narrow and pointed shoes and the heel pain and arch pain from flat feet. What are the best shoes to buy for all these problems?Running shoes tend to push the foot forward and increase pressure at the top and to the ball of the foot. Painful to walk with this new tendonitis causing foot swelling,inflamation of the ankle and foot. I have had chronic Plantars Faciatis for 20 years with thick facia in both feet!Help!!!

LuckyGranny said...

Several years ago I discovered a cushioning product which was then being sold by Foot Smart. The brand name is Epitact and the gel-like substance is called Epithelium. It is sold in several forms (ball-of-foot pad, toe slips, bunion covers, and also in sheets for cutting to size) and is absolutely the best cushioning for any painful area. It was subsequently removed from the Foot Smart site and is now, as best I can discover, only sold in Europe and Australia. I found one website in England that shipped it to me several years ago, but they can no longer ship to the US. The products are listed on Amazon but said to be currently unavailable. If they were available, shipping would be $75. There are a couple of reviews of this product on Amazon which agree with my appreciation of it. I have lost the fat pad on the balls of my feet and find I can walk comfortably only when wearing Epithelium pads. My question is are you familiar with this product and do you know why it is not available in the US?

love to cook! said...

I am a type 1 diabetic. I take very good care of myself. My A1C's are always great. My question is I thought that cross were not good for us to wear. Especially with arch support or just in general for the feet. My son's pediatrician told us never to wear them. I just recently bought a black flat shoe from Naturalizer and I need a nicer pair of shoes for work and by the end of the day I'm so uncomfortable. I'm not finding any nice looking diabetic shoes. I wear Ugg brand slippers and they are wonderful. Are they not recommended? I'll switch to another brand. I'm not stuck on one brand. I wear slippers 365 days a year. I try to stick to wide shoes because they feel better. Is that too much to do? My feet are tired at the end of the day and rubbing on the bone above my big toes. Help:)

Anonymous said...

What do you think about Dansko?

Anonymous said...

Dr M, I have been a patient of yours and Dr J for several years- my feet have been great thanks to your some recommendations!! I have no been wearing Crocs Rx for many years- but my current pair is worn and I went onto their web site to order another pair. It appears that they don't sell them or Relief anymore - so, what do you recommend?? I love my Crocs but have become very used to the thicker less bendy sole...? Thanks!

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

HI Anonymous,
Glad to hear you've been doing well. For some inexplicable reason, Crocs has discontinued the Relief and Cloud. The new version that I recommend is the Crocs Specialist with no vents. Do not get the one with vents as it is not nearly so good.
Stay well!
Cathy
:)

Dealsbrick Online Shopping Website said...

Thanx dear for such a nice blog article.
"buy shoes online"
"buy sports shoes online"

esion said...

The special red soles make Christian Louboutin pumps win great success in the market. With its luxury design and very simple design, Christian Louboutin Pumps has obtained superb reputation between style people.
Christian Louboutin Daffodile 160mm Python Platform Pumps Blue
Christian Louboutin Daffodile 160mm Leather Paltfrom Pumps Green
Christian Louboutin Daffodile 160mm Suede Platform Pumps Orange

IamTHATmom said...

Hi...
I have (self diagnosed with help from Dr Google) Morton's Neuroma on my left foot. For about 17 years.
My foot is starting to change, like my toes are getting crooked, after walking with this callous for so many years.
I also have fallen arches and a heal spur. Though the latter does not cause pain anymore.
What can I do? My feet hurt.