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Monday, January 5, 2015

Podiatry Recommended Comfortable Women's Dress Shoe - Dansko Tilda

Dansko Tilda

Podiatrist Recommended Comfortable Women's Dress Shoe



I just came from Dillards where I checked out the latest Dansko shoe selection. I was disappointed because some of their styles do not meet the criteria of what makes a shoe comfortable. I am a huge fan of Dansko, but a word of caution - when you are shopping for Dansko - make sure that the sole does not bend or flex at all. Some of their new styles look like they should be comfortable and they have a thick sole but when you pick them up and bend them - they are too flexible. Of course, the Dansko Professional Clog is still one of the best shoes out there - particularly for anyone working retail or who has been diagnosed with Hallux Limitus or Hallux Rigidus. 

The Dansko Tilda is a great selection for anyone who has a 'bump' or bone spur on the top of their midfoot because there is no strap across the midfoot area which could aggravate the spur, cause the bone spur to increase in size as well as cause more pain.

The sole of the Dansko Tilda is thick, rigid and non-flexible, which means that it will be more comfortable. One of the major criteria of what makes a shoe comfortable for all day wear is that the sole needs to be thick, rigid and non-flexible. Less motion through the foot joints means less inflammation, less swelling and less chance of injury. It also means less motion through any areas of previous injury or surgery and less motion through any osteoarthritic joints, which allows for more comfort for all day wear. 

Although slightly tapered, the toebox of the Dansko Tilda is large enough to accommodate mild to possibly moderate hammertoes and bunions. It has good rearfoot control, which offers more biomechanical control to the foot and ankle, which helps decrease mechanical strain on the foot, ankle, knees, hips and lower back. 

If you have a narrow foot, this shoe might not work for you. Because there is not midfoot strap, your heel may try to lift out of the back of the shoe with walking. I recommend going to a store and trying it on to make sure you have a good fit. Danskos are excellent shoes but they don't work for everyone. Remember, don't buy any Danskos (or any shoes) that has a sole that bends or is flexible. 

*This shoe is recommended for patients with:
*Mild Bunions
*Mild Hammertoes
*Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion through the 1st toe joint)
*Hallux Rigidus (no range of motion through the 1st toe joint)
*Functional Hallux Limitus
*Morton's Neuroma
*Capsulitis
*Plantar Plate Injury
*Mild Tailor's Bunion
*Bone spurs on the top of the midfoot area
*Plantar Fasciitis (heel pain)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Osteoarthritis of any forefoot of midfoot joints
*Rheumatoid Arthritis (check with your podiatrist)
*Mild Hypermobility (wear with a dress orthotic)
*Mild Over-Pronation (wear with a dress orthotic) 
*Recovered from a previous Lisfranc's Injury (check with your podiatrist)
*Metatarsalgia
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis

*This shoe is not recommended for patients with: 
*Narrow feet
*Severe Bunions
*Severe Hammertoes
*Severe Tailor's Bunions
*Severe Hypermobility
*Severe Over-Pronation
*Diabetics 
*Peripheral Neuropathy (nerve damage)
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (poor circulation)
*History of foot ulcerations
*Charcot Foot


For more information, check out these articles on my blog (using the search box): 
"My Feet Hurt: Top 10 Things to do to Alleviate Foot pain today" and 
"Shoe Recommendations for patient's recovering from Lisfranc's Injuries."

I hope this was helpful and I thank you for reading the blog! If you have any suggestions of excellent shoes to review, I would love to hear from you. 

Have a great day!

Dr. Cathleen A. McCarthy

:)


9 comments:

Michele said...

I have noticed that many of the newer Danskos are more flexible. It seems that the company is aiming for fashion at expense of comfort. I have a pair of Sanita Professional shoes that I have been very pleased with. What are your thoughts on Sanita shoes?

Anonymous said...

Hello! I am looking for a great dress shoe that is black, with simple design (per company requirements), can be walked in for hours as I am a tour guide that needs to have professional shoes. They must be made of polishable leather material. I also tend to not do well with heels. What would you recommend for me?

Joey Constanza said...

I've heard a bit about these shoes. My wife has been having foot problems for a while now, yet she refuses to go to the doctor about it. I'll see about getting some of these shoes for here and see if they make a difference. If not, then I will for sure take her to the doctors. http://www.allaboutfeet.com.au

Quin Trent said...

I had no idea that podiatrists did reviews on shoes that were great and comfortable for people to wear. This is one of those things that people really need to look into and pay attention to. Now that I know that these shoes are comfortable dress shoes that I can wear that won't hurt my feet at the end of the day, I am going to have to look into getting myself a pair.
http://www.walkwithoutpain.com.au

Andrea said...

Hi! I was recently diagnosed with functional hallux limitus. I have orthotics that help, but can't use them in sandals. I have no idea what to look for in a sandal that will accommodate my issue. I read your post on sandals, but am not sure if your recommendations for hallux limitus referred to structural or functional (as I understand, these two things are accommodated differently). What should I look for in a sandal? Is it better to have a softer insole to allow for more movement of the joint? My orthotics have a first ray cutout and reverse morton's extension. Thanks!

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Andrea,
The best sandals that I know of are the Wolky Tulip, Ruby, Cloggy or Jewel. Each of these sandals has a thick, rigid, non-flexible sole that is perfect for hallux limitus. They each have a soft insole with good arch support as well as forefoot, midfoot or rearfoot strapping for more biomechanical control. I would recommend that you find a store that carries these and try them on. If they don't work, check out my article "top 20 comfortable women's sandals."
Thank you for reading!
Cathy
:)

James said...

Is it safe to wear used shoes? I find expensive brand shoes on EbaY. In recent years I have had increasing knee and lower back pain. The used shoes I buy are elite brands

Anonymous said...

Hi, Dr. Cathleen. Thanks for your reviews. I have been buying shoes with rigid soles and can see the difference and how they protect the foot. However, I spend many days a week volunteering where I have to walk on uneven, broken sidewalks and in some areas where there is no sidewalk at all I'm walking on hilly grass areas (varied terrain, depends on the neighborhood). I find that the rigid soles protect my foot in one way, but since the soles don't give at all, I'm afraid what WILL give one day is my ankle. (Wearing 1 inch wedges.) Would you still recommend rigid soles for this terrain? I have to wear a professional shoe (no sneakers). Thank you! ~Maryanne

Doctor of Podiatry Discusses and Recommends Shoes. said...

Hi Maryanne,
That's one of the tougher ones! I have the same experience. Dansko professional clogs are fabulous on retail, concrete flooring, but increases the chance of falling when I am walkin on cobblestones or uneven pavement. I find that Allegria works well because it is rigid with just a touch of flexibility and it has a wide sole. It is not a wedge heel, but this is the boot I wore when I went to Paris and was walking 10 miles a day in all sorts of weather and on uneven surfaces and, with a dress orthotic, it was amazingly comfortable. I also found the boot on 6pm.com for $36! Another option is the Wolky Cloggy. I DO still recommend rigid soles for uneven terrain. A flexible sole on uneven terrain is setting you up for a Lisfranc's fracture or sprain.
Let me know how it works out!
Cathy
:)